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20121201
20121231
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collapsed but rather than the eight geography is in its preciousness as now you have people in indonesia that care about what they did interrupting the flotilla and you have crawled in bangladesh and i'm sure tomorrow we may see in malaysia and indonesia and elsewhere enraged about the movie a was made in california but while rage can spread around the world, it is a starting point. once you start to analyze what is likely to happen in egypt next and in syria you get different scenarios based on the legacy of geography. geography shows libya was in the country but a geographical expression with triple the oriented than tunisia or alexandria and egypt so it can only be governed through the totalitarian means and once that collapses though we have an elected government in tripoli it cannot project power beyond a greater aaa lisieux you have a problem with governor allin capacity and lydia that cannot deal with the crisis in egypt it's different. in egypt you have a country that has been an age-old cluster of civilization for thousands of years, a cohesive community beyond the normal where
is in indonesia in the west new guinea. it's owned by the people that own bisbee. now you know, they run the mine and they will come in and play pool and they are nice guys. i think it was chris hedges that said the people that are destroying the world are just doing a job. they are nice people. in indonesia in this mine they are not just destroying the place, people are dying in this mine, they have hired the military to become the private service of the mine which is illegal by the way under the u.s. law. they were busted by the clinton administration, stripped of insurance, but they have henry kissinger on the door, so they got everything worked out. this has 18,000 people working at 15,000 feet. straight down through glacier. it's the biggest gold mine and basically the biggest cotton - the world. but, people are shocked. there's a huge battle going on because they're putting 300,000 tons of waste every single day in the two rivers without, like in america you can't do that. but there you just play with on and it doesn't matter. so, what you are asking is to be pushed off and if you do you pu
the country has political resolve, it can make extraordinary resolve with assistance from others. indonesia, perhaps my favorite example. there the government has dedicated itself to creating a civilian leader -- legal structure of law enforcement institutions to fight terrorism. indonesia has scored more than 100 consecutive convictions in terrorist cases and the police has had major successes in breaking up terrorist cells linked to violent extremist organizations. many of us saw -- thought at the time several years ago that indonesia hung in the balance. no one thinks that now. the capacity building can work. we must continue to innovate and improve our efficacy. i said at the outset that we were determined to do a better job in countering the violent extremism. the miti about our efforts to legitimize the narrative. we established the center for strategic counter-terrorism communications. house at the state department, it is a true interest agency endeavor with the mandate from president obama. they do many things including working with our embassies on a range of activities to undermin
and efficiently. he gave his cia a lot of roe. they started doing less well by, there's a failed coup in indonesia in 1958, a botched cue in syria i think and 57. and eisenhower's own advisers quietly start telling him the problems here, the father of the -- [inaudible] then like bob lovett and david bruce, smart guys. you've got a problem. and he says, you know, and you to get rid of dulles, allen does. his brother, john foster dulles, sector essay, a little harder to fire him, but more importantly, ike said it takes a strange kind of genius to run an intelligence service. and he's right about that. and allen dulles did have a strange kind of genius. so ike was reluctant to get rid of them. so he did. i think he regretted. susan's dad told me after the u2 got shut down he went to his father on the plane, the paris summit about to collapse her some, and said to him, dad, you should have fired back i. and ike blew up and basically said i'm the president and you're not. but it was little defensive about it because, yeah, he probably should have. these things are always clear in retrospect than they
knew which is when he wrote about going to the war in indonesia i was afraid to go in there, there was a young woman nurse peace corps volunteer and she asked me to go into the war and i was afraid sargent shriver is supposed to be this great guy and he was afraid and he was human. they have to negotiate a deal but she was touching other human beings that were struggling, people that were sick, and when he was 45 or 46i think that she would have loved to have been that nurse in that room touching the people affected by leprosy, and to have that experience and show what the piece is about where human beings are interacting with each other, not some peace in the theory of diplomats which is often times elusive. this is real human peace, and interactions of that's why he always said i wish i were you because i have the opportunity to deal with that. he was very happy in his own life, but he was excited and wished that he could have other opportunities. to experience those things and help creating those situations. >> that was a mean question to ask me, but i was a good one. [la
of japan, korea, vietnam, thailand, singapore, indonesia, burma; all of which represent the future of the united states in terms of trade, security and cultural growth in the coming decades. with respect to burma, there was a great moment for me to be able to sit down and see aung san suu kyi recognized by the congress a month or so ago, coming to this country as a member, an elected member of their parliament. we began the change in that relationship from our office, directly from our office based on work that i had begun and become interested in over a period of six years before i was elected to the senate. we, i'm very proud to say, laid the groundwork for the historic visit in 2009 from inside our office. often i would say against the will and against the advice of our own state department. we used validators. we talked to people we knew in the region. i became the only american leader ever to meet with general shui, leader of the military junta, to express my belief that we could work forward to have a different relationship. i met with aung san suu kyi, and i hope that those
with india and indonesia. not really new but integrating partnerships but our partnership with china is critical. as we look at both opportunities to build on cooperation and franken opportunity compete economically and then to avoid any prospect in light of conflict. so those are a critical element. as we think about international institutions including both regional and more broad international institutions, those are a key part of that as well. to us, the other two pieces i'm going to put in our presence. with 60 years of history where the united states has provided a stabilizing role toward economic development, and the fact that most of international trade floats, as the apple noted, is a key part of that. and with a strong interest, not just the asia-pacific region by the international community does. so as we continue to sustain and enhance our presence through a stabilizing function and fun at the end of the day when you have the capacity as a u.s. military to have policy as well. that's a global capability. but that means that they respected the choices that are made by othe
father, raised in indonesia and hawaii. i was beginning to sense how fitting into the world might not be as simple as it might seem. and so, to see this man, this center, this powerful an accomplished person, when it came to what you think the senator might look like at the time, the way that he commanded the respect of the entire nation, it hinted to me what might be possible for my own life. this was a man that stepped up to serve his country even after his fellow japanese americans were declared enemy aliens. a man that believed in america even when its government did not necessarily believe in him. that meant something to me. it gave me a powerful sense, one that i could not put into words. as i watched the hearings, listening to his piercing questions night after night, i learned how a democracy was supposed to work. a government of, by, and for the people. nobody is above the law. we have an obligation to hold each other countable. these things that we stand for, the ideals that we hold dear, they are bigger than any one person, party, or politician. nobody communicated that
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8